Saturday, June 27, 2009

Paralysing Mullahs’ Regime


There has been always a strong correlation between the structure of power in Iran and oil. Not only industry and services are heavily dependent on oil revenue, but also in a larger scale all repressive forces and institutions of dictatorial regimes rely on it. Oil production in Iran is not only at the service of development of country, but mainly at the interests of the corrupt ruling elite and especially survival of their oppressive regime.

In the case of the IRI, oil is the greatest income of state mafia which makes the regime possible to set up their repressive institutions, propaganda machine, thousands of plain clothes thugs to beat up angry people, apologist groups in the West, sold intellectuals from various factions of the regime who propagate that any the regime is both legitimate and can be reformed within its constitution, and terrorist groups to advance the IRI agenda in and out of the country. The regime also spends a part of this Iranian national resource to help the two Islamist terrorist groups, Hamas, Hezbollah to prevent peaceful solutions in the region.

The U.N. Security Council resolutions and EU have already mentioned the possibility of oil sanctions on the IRI due to its nuclear ambitions and its strategy to export violence in the region. In the light of such resolutions and added to them the ongoing brutalities after the coup, the world must timely step up: sanction on fuel supplies to Iran is the first step to shake off the regime and is now widely expected by both Iranians and the international community.

The domestic consume of gasoline is estimated 75 million litres a day, of which 36 million is imported from India. If the gasoline delivery is stopped, Iran’s domestic consummation, including that of the repressive machine, of the regime, can be paralysed within a week. In such a case the heroic people of Iran can better do the rest to send the whole regime in the dustbin of history.

India supplies a great part of the needed gasoline which helps the Mullahs’ regime to survive– it imports Iranian crude oil and exports to Iran gasoline after refining. In a perspective of an international solidarity with the oppressed people of Iran in struggle against the illegitimate regime of coup d’état, India as the biggest democracy of the world can play an important factor to side with the freedom-loving people of Iran in their struggle against the totalitarian IRI in Iran.

4 comments:

  1. Unfortunately the track record of any sanctions having to do with oil are dismal. To think sovereign nations who are energy hungry would forgo a lucrative trade to feed the energy needs of their populace is wishful thinking. To assume big oil will forgo profits because young people died in a repressive regime is lunacy. Throughout history the big oil has probably made many deals that have led to blood shed in the name of profits.
    Lets not hold our breath.

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  2. In fact here is proof already that blood will not stop the flow of MONEY or ENERGY..
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    Indian firms plan $5 bln Iran LNG project -report
    Saturday, 27 June 2009
    Reuters: A consortium of Indian companies plans to spend around $5 billion to develop an offshore gas field in Iran and ship the liquefied natural gas (LNG) to India, Iranian news channel Press TV said on Friday (YESTERDAY JUNE 26th).
    PETROUS

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  3. ^^ I know a bit about aforementioned contract. Ali Akbar Velayati, advisor in International Affairs to the Supreme Leader have had his hand in this project. How much did he get? I don't know

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  4. Probably enough to float million dollar checks drawn on banks outside of Iran for a few decades! Yet that is not even the point, of course these guys will get kick backs no one expected otherwise. The point is no external power will stop doing lucrative business with anyone just to support a just cause. The only cause to support is national interests . It helps if that goal just happens to line up well with personal interests of the negotiating parties.

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